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immigration system it cannot be what it is destined to be. >> a few days after the election when the republicans looked at the figures from the president how mitt romney had done with hispanic voters, there was like a 44-point gap. they said we need to do something aggressive on immigration. but it wasn't a couple weeks. republicans couldn't agree on what needs to be done, the fervor seemed to have already cooled. how do you get your own party on the same page, let alone bring on democrats? >> i disagree. i don't think that's what is happening. what is happening, the concept of immigration reform, there is a lot of consensus. the details of immigration reform need to be examined. i'll give you an example. we have millions of people waiting to come here legally and they come to my office and say we have done it the right way, waited, paid the fees, but you are telling me if i came here illegally it would have been faster? it didn't seem right. that is the kind of debate we are going to have. on the ag worker-guest worker, there are labor unions that are not in favor of a guest wor
about the fiscal cliff, affordable care act in laying the groundwork for the 2013-2014 elections. >> why a writers institute? >> i think it is something that is very important. we are a culture of words, of voices. words are a key to our imagination, our capacity to imagine things. we are not completely tied to print on the page. there is no other art form so readily accessible other than perhaps soma, which we work with, too. there is something in literature that captures the human. . the >> joint american history television and c-span local content vehicles as we look behind the scenes of a letter lives of new york city. >> next you hear from bradley manning's attorney about his case. he is accused of leaking classified documents to the web site wikileaks. the trial is under way in maryland. he testified earlier on the conditions he has experienced since being detained in iraq. this is half an hour. >> i really appreciate the turn out here, especially the turn of by the press. thank you for that. i have not participated in any public event for today. i also avoid any interviews with th
, that pretty well describes your party after the shellacking you got in the election. some members of your party are further along in the stages of grief but the republicans all seem to fall somewhere along that spectrum. let's take a look. so first there's denial. as in everything's fine! carry on. none of this is really happening! that's where the majority of the republicans, at least in congress are. but we should cut them a little slack. afterall everybody from peggy noonan to karl rove assured them they would be in the white house by this time so they're understandably shock and distressed and poor speaker john boehner is hopelessly stuck in that stage. his is, of course, willful denial. a stubborn refusal to recognize reality are. but it is denial nonetheless. today, he dug in his heels. he refused to budge. he released a statement blaming the president for the impasse saying "we don't have time for the president to continue shifting the goalposts. we need to solve this problem." in fact, his approach all a
years answering the same question. but right after the election, we sent a plan to the president where we gave revenues but looking for spending cuts. and he took three weeks to come back to us. he has gone on still on the campaign trail, still working through. but you have to understand, republicans have not waited to solve this problem and sat back. in the summer, we passed a bill that froze the rates, and passed it. it sat in the senate. we believe we want to solve this problem. we think this is our moment. this is our time. >> is the moment -- does it come down to this, where you would say, look, we'll give you higher marginal tax rates if we get something significant on spending, medicare, in return? >> it doesn't solve the problem. if the president is asking for higher ratings, he is asking for more revenue. most economists agree the best way to get that is through closing special loopholes. and when you close those, it makes a fair tax process. so people invest on the return, not invest based upon what the irs says. >> senator durbin, the opening position, as i sort of gleaned i
to win the presidentee again, george w. bush was really a recluse. i think now that the election is over the republicans lost. he wants to have a role in one of his causes. immigration is a passion he shares with his brother jeb, former governor of florida who is thinking of his own political future and possibly a white house run and wants to help in the reset of the republican party which will include taking a serious look at actually finally engaging on immigration reform. jon: fair to say hispanics did not exactly flock to mitt romney this time around. george w. bush did pretty well with them both four years ago and eight years ago. >> reporter: very well, he got about 41% in his last election, that is a number republicans are going to have to meet in order to win the demographics of a presidential run and get a coalition that gets you the map to win the white house. 71-27, which it was this time is not going to get you the white house. you have to be upwards of 40%, possibly in future years higher than that. and george bush, with his compassionate conservatism, his texas heritage, th
and treasury secretary timothy geithner. >> we are flabbergasted. we have seven weeks between election day in the end of the year. three of those weeks have been wasted. >> we are not going to extend an extension of the tax rates. we think they need to go back to those levels. if you don't do that, you have to ask yourself, whose taxes are we going to raise? were we going to find the money bring a balanced plan in place? jenna: senator lindsey graham, a republican known for reaching across the aisle, not looking at this with a great deal of optimism. >> i think we're going over the fiscal cliff. it's pretty clear that they have made this happen. they are not saving social security and medicare and medicaid from imminent bankruptcy. jenna: james is live in washington with more. reporter: yes, what is clear is increasingly, the two sides -- the obama, white house, senate democrats on one side, senate republicans on the other, there is a ticking clock involved here. they should be hitting their stride right about now. timothy geithner is trying to avoid plunging of the fiscal cliff. he has ma
who could just not sit quietly, who had to take up the cause. in the 2010 election cycle, he was one of the strongest voices this he had would a lost our way -- that we'd lost our way in washington. jim is a kind, sincere man, an individual who is a joy to be around. when it comes to what's going on in america, jim understands that if we don't make some changes we're going to lose our way of life. that's what's driven him above all else, to try to keep our country a place to be place where you can be anything. i look forward to working with jim in the private sector. from a personal point of view, we've had a great ride together. it has been fun. it has been challenging, and i think we put south carolina on the map in different ways at different times, and to people back in south carolina, i hope if you get to see jim anytime soon, just say "thank you." because whether you agree with him or not, he was doing what he thought was best for south carolina and the united states. at the end of the day, that's as good as it gets. because if you're doing what you really believe in and you're
and new election would have to be called in 30 days of that happening. some analysts say his choice is not a shoo-in. >> what you need to consider here the opposition is strong position in venezuela. they did exactly well in the october elections. they are in a prime position to exploited the crisis in the regime. i don't think maduro is a shoo-in necessarily. >> he added if he were to be elected president of venezuela he would be as every bit as bad as u.s. ever since chavez took over venezuela his country as taken on a steady anti-american tone. he developed friendships with some of the world's worst dictators. no now, at least publicly chavez appears to be up for the continuing battling with cancer telling his people, quote, with god's will we will come out of this victorious. i have faith in that. that is a quote from chavez. >> gregg: arthel nevil, thanks. >> heather: as we mentioned we have just learned that president obama and house speaker john boehner met today at the white house to talk about ways to resolve the fiscal cliff. meanwhile, we have brand-new reaction from lawm
spending. he went from 70% support down to below 50% and lost the house. now he gets re-elected with less strength, not against a war hero but a guy from massachusetts, and the republicans have the house and he thinks somebody made him king and he's going to have more taxes, more spending, and more regulations. it's a real problem for him. he doesn't have the mandate he thinks he does. so i think he takes us over the cliff because he doesn't -- he's got blinders on. he doesn't see where he stands in the universe. >> okay. there are a couple things to unpack here. i want to go back to this question -- i think what i'm confused about is this kind of game of smoke and mirrors that seems to be playing out on the right. and i ask you again, is closing a loophole and ending a deduction the same thing as raising taxes? >> you have to look at the whole package. i mean i would think if you're going to -- and the other key thing here is, anybody -- >> is that a no? >> you have to -- first you have to look at the whole package and find out what's in it. to sit here and shoot at negotiating strategie
got elected on this time and what was most present in the populous mind is he needs to stay strong on what he was elected on and what he said he was going to do. host: this is from the facebook page. the question is, what do you think the president pose a number one priority should be. brian is joining us from texas on the republican line. caller: good morning. i am down here in texas and we voted the other way. the number one thing i see is jobs. you have economic growth, you have money to in the system moving. getting to the people that need it, not the people sitting in washington, d.c. i was just listening to what mr. obama was hanged and all of the things he promised in 2008, and now with a new election, and demanded, raising taxes and $1.60 trillion in texas. how is that going to help anybody? people do not have the money now. where are we going to get it? coming from the government, everybody thinks that are entitled to something. thank you for the call. the top solution is to break the congressional gridlock. north dakota on the democrats' line. caller: good morning. the nu
. the smallest minority as not important as well. hopefully, as the elected officials will be around the table until the next several weeks, they will bear this a in mind. thank you for voting. let's move to the next poll question. you can see it on the screen as well. this is thinking about what kind of a role the u.s. president should take a in terms of a more realistic, short-term approach to facing challenges are a long term visionary approach where the focus is on the future and where we are going in the next 10-20 years. which of the following approaches to you think a u.s. presidential candidate should take? you will see two options. should a u.s. president take a practical approach and difficult times addressing near-term challenges or a visionary approach focusing on long-term goals for the future and not losing perspective of where we want to go to? go ahead and text to 22333. the response code you agree with can tweak at @gt we will see if it matches the opinion poll. a fair size minority, about the 44% felt short-term obstacles was the important focus of the nation. it looks
tax rates and he was elected based on his tax the rich policy. he says that america is poised to take off and if it doesn't, it's the republicans fault. listen. >> you have the u.s. chamber of commerce hardly an arm of my administration or the democratic party. i think, said the other day, we can't be going through another debt crisis, a debt ceiling crisis like we did in 2011. that has to be dealt with. so, i think businesses are going to be ready to hire. we're seeing pretty strong consumer confidence despite weaknesses in europe and even in asia. i think america is poised to take off. stuart: well, the republicans are set to respond today when speaker boehner goes in front of the cameras. will he show signs of retreat or any sign of compromise? remember, the president wants higher tax rates. will john boehner try to move the line that the president has drawn? we will have it for you live here on "varney & company" starting around ten o'clock eastern. then we have darden restaurants, the parent of olive garden, red lobster. it says its businesses could be hurt by bad publicity. dard
to college, keep a roof over their heads. that's the choice in this election. >> the administration is still asking you to send in stories about what being able to keep about $2,000 more a year means to you and your family. the president is planning to meet with state governors this week and the business roundtable, a big business lobbying group. this morning fiscal cliff negotiations appear to be at a stand still. treasury secretary tim geithner says the president's offer is unwavering. we're going to let tax rates go up for top earners and republicans will have to work with that reality. >> there is no responsible way we can govern this country with those low rates in place for future generations. those rates are going to have to go up. >> house speaker john boehner appears to be struggling now that the president and democrats are negotiating for a position of power. talking points memo points out republicans are used to getting 70% to 75% of what they ask for in these types of negotiations but now speaker boehner
%. mr. verrastro, we have heard a lot in this election about the war on coal. from these numbers we're seeing in the data, is the coal industry in serious trouble? guest: because of the low cost and availability of natural gas, gas has displaced a lot of coal use. adam is right. unless we move out these coal plants or retire them early, they will still be in operation. coal usage in the country has gone down. it has been good for the environment. host: those in eastern and central u.s. can give us a call at 202-585-380. those in the pacific, 202-585- 381. -- 3881. teresa, yoyou are on with mr. sieminski and mr. verrastro. caller: i want to know the corporations that are involved in this. host: involved in what exactly? caller: with the u.s. becoming energy independent. talk about how you pute this report together, mr. sieminski. guest: it is to look at the fuel production, not by company. on the eia website,, you can get a lot of information on the companies that are importing oil, producing oil, natural gas, grenoble's. there's a lot of information there on the company
just lost re-election and the eight or so seats. on the other hand, he still has a very diverse caucus in terms of ideology and it's going to be very difficult. you'll notice in hiss comments he didn't say no to 37%. that said, if he agreed to 37% and he's basically bilateral talks with the president, who says the kwaux is going to approve that. he could end up with a lot of egg on his face if he agrees with the president on this, they go forward with the vote, and it doesn't pass. >> david, the office of management and budget, omb, asking government agencies to figure out what they would cut if we do go over this fiscal cliff. talking a trillion dollars in cuts over ten years. that would mean furloughs for some federal workers, slower hiring, outside contracting, the closer we get to the cliff, the more real it begins to seem. how does that then change the negotiations? >> well, i think it's all part of the political pressure the white house is trying to apply to the congressional republicans. we saw the same thing in '11 when we had the near government shutdown and the dispute over t
a mandate to raise taxes. i won election. i didn't run on raising taxes on anybody. i have a mandate as well. gerri: all right, thank you, and should congress and president stay in washington until the cliff is resolved? log on, vote, and i'll share the results at the end of the show. put them in a room, lock the door, throw away the key. it's a thought. with negotiations stalled, thous out of town, going over the cliff? let's did douglas holtz-eakin, the former cbo director. doug, the house is gone. they are on vacation. how did the people leave? we have the biggest fiscal crisis of i don't know how long, something to do something about it? it's one thing to have a big recession. it's another thing when the problem is of your own creation, and you turn your back on it. what do you make of this? >> well, it's a very dangerous situation. if we go over the cliff, the taxes go up $39 # -- $395 billion, spending slashed, a plunging economy, a recipe for a recession, something no american needs to hear about now. getting past the fiscal cliff is an imperative. we are having a one-sided conversati
the fiscal cliff. right after the election wall street dropped 5% when everybody suddenly focused on the fiscal cliff and realized that this was a problem. but since then it's kind of bumped along at this sort of level. i don't think wall street is at all sanguine about the idea that if we went over the fiscal cliff, life would go on as we know it and everything would be fine. >> one of the things that was really interesting to me to bear out that point is ken conrad yesterday who's been so down, i mean, he's leaving the senate. he's done this for seven years. they can't produce deals. and yesterday when i interviewed him, joe, he said i think we're going to make this. i think the boehner offer had significant indicators that something here is going on, and they're going to come together. >> also, kent conrad, a guy -- i've loved him for a long time, deficit hawk. they haven't allowed him to put a budget out for years. he's growing frustrated. i'm sure he's going to be glad to leave. but i was surprised by that as well. you see also, sam stein, republicans are now starting to real
if it falls apa apart? >> yeah. they just won an election. their position on policies are much more popular than the republican positions are and they're willing to go over the cliff. going over the cliff for them is not the worst of all possible worlds. they get the tax position that they want, they get spending cuts that they can basically live with, and obama is capable of managing the economic fallout of it. that's another reason why i think it's important that geithner is the front man here, that geithner is the type of guy who can talk to the street in a way that's very assuring. >> the street, not the streets. >> yeah. >> also if they -- if we go over the cliff, i mean, the republicans then look like they let it happen all for the 2% as michael was saying because that's what this becomes about. that's not something they want. it doesn't put them in a good position. to some degree this is a choreographed dance that has to happen. they cannot come to a deal without a humongous fight. >> this is also the white house i think has managed the optics well on this and dubbed it the great rea
on the november mid term election? and if you hook at-- and then later on, reflexively supported the regime in ruwan da when there were more war crimes committed and since vowed to heal that, but, you know, you've seen her political statements recently that showed there's a political side of susan rice and willingness for talking points that we can't afford as secretary of state and john kerry, he was part of the foreign senate relations committee and he was back in the late 60's and talked about war crimes that he reportedly saw against the vietnam war and you have some track records that don't make them the best fit. >> there are numerous republicans, john mccain, lindsey graham, a barraso who sates i would support john kerry as secretary of state who in their words would cruise through a nomination. and how would an affect if those two are in place? >> if you like what's in the last four years, you're going to get more of the same. deep defense cuts. if you had john kerry as secretary of defense. what we need is a strong secretary of defense, in spite of drawdowns and budget cuts is goin
for payback for their votes. >> after the election of jimmy carter, he went to washington, d.c., he came back with some bacon. that's what you do. our people in an overwhelming way supported the reelection of this president and there ought to be a quid pro quo and you ought to exercise leadership -- of course not just that, but why not. martha: you have got to bring home the bacon according to that councilwoman. many cities and state are in the same situation. will they make the same request of the president and washington? stuart, what do you think about that piece of tape there? >> finally it has been said in public. the detroit city councilmember saying publicly we deserve a bailout. detroi indeed vote overwhelmingly for president obama. 73% of the vote went for president obama. detroit will probably run out of money within days. the word bankruptcy is being applied to the city of detroit. she says there ought to be a quid pro quo, why not. she is publicly calling for what amounts to a federal bailout. it would be called help for the city, help for the states. but you asked it. who is next
elected office in america. i would like any democrats to tell me [indiscernible] during the whitewater investigation was the work under subpoena. that is evidence tampering. those are two felonies she has committed while she has been in the white house then thehost: bg that issue is something we should be concerned about customer -- do you think that issue is something we should be concerned about? drew is a democrat in baltimore. caller: good morning. host: what do you think about hillary clinton's future? caller: i think she is the next logical step that we need. my grandfather was a democrat in delaware. he served two terms. allyink she is what we re4all needs and what we need for the country to move ahead. host: steven is an independent from connecticut. caller: thank you for taking my call. i really like hillary clinton. i think she is a hard worker. i think her old man is a hard worker, too. whitewater was like three wars ago. that was a long time ago. i would like to see jeb bush run against hillary clinton. i think they can move our nation forward. host: if jeb bush -- if it is
faced in the election and the total rebuke amongst hispanic voters. the dynamics and the forces are there for immigration reform. more so now and that ever before. will it be difficult? yes, will it be complicated? of course. i think people have come to terms with the fact that you're not going to deport 12 million plus people. that's never going to happen. so let's find a way to do this in a decent, humane way. i think if we do it the country wins, it's not about a republican or democrat victory. >> joe, how would the gop react to a proposal for a path to citizenship. for the 12 million illegal immigrants who are living here. >> there's a shot to get this done. chris has spoken right. we have to consider what's best for the united states of america. and the best way for the united states to move forward is to listen to those, those voices of reason, senator john mccain some years ago along with the late senator ted kennedy had an immigration package that provided people with path to citizenship. this has to become an option. certainly if republicans have from a party standpoint
of whose tax plan was chosen in the court of public opinion on election day. >> under my plan, first of all, 98% of folks who make less than 250,000, you wouldn't see your income taxes go up a single dime. all right? because you're the ones who need relief. but we're not going to be able to get it done unless we also ask the wealthiest households to pay higher taxes on their income officials $250,000. the same rate we had when bill clinton was president and our economy kree aed nearly 23 million new jobs. >> and there are reports that republicans are considering a doomsday plan should talks break down. according to senior republican sources the gop would allow a vote on extending bush tax cuts for the middle class and nothing more. under one variation of this plan, house republicans would vote present on the bill to voice their disapproval but still allowing it to pass entirely on democratic votes. >>> with hillary clinton wrapping up her final trip abroad as secretary of state, president obama is expected to announce his pick to replace her at the state department as early as this week. th
. they re-elected the president. the president ran on an agenda of giving a tax break to 98% of the american people, and that opportunity is before us. the senate has worked their will. it's now our opportunity to do that before the holiday season is over. the expression time is fleeting has never been more apropos than it is today. we have very few working days left in this 112th congress to actually act upon what the american people want us to do, and we have even fewer days now that the house republican leadership has reduced the working days this week. we can still get this done, but it's going to take an effort to work, as i said before, as the american people want us to do in a bipartisan way to move forward. and i know that we have the opportunity to really accept the agenda straight today, and with that i'll turn it back to the chair, mr. larson. >> well, thank you, joe, and without further ado let me introduce the individual that's spear heading this effort from the great state of minnesota, tim walz, affectionately known in our caucus as a sergeant major and he's got a sergeant maj
in 1992, on election day day itself, it was jack kemp who is talking about 1996. we were watching that campaign. last night was the second annual awards in his name. the first award dinner went to paul ryan last year, and this year, the recipient must marco rubio. from the outset, both of these guys mentioned seeing each other on the campaign trail over the course of the last year. marco rubio held over 80 rally events and they expect to see each other in the early voting states. >> i will see you at the reunion. dinner, table for two. [laughter] >> thank you for your invitation for lunch in iowa and new hampshire, but i will not stand by and watch the people of south carolina ignored. [laughter] greg: south carolina voted third in the nominating process. both of them obviously joking about it. marco rubio has visited ohio and iowa since the election day. it is on. jenna: either you are to have a couple of diners that you could recommend if they are looking for referrals. there is so much talk about the future of the gop. we just talked about it with governor rick perry. as folks
in tax hikes and then once re-elected he doubled it. even if he gets that higher amount, we did some calculations, that is only going to pay for about 16 days of government spending. aren't taxes insignificant compared to entitlement reform which you and i were talking about, president obama promised he would tackle it in his first term? >> entitlement vessel basically everything which is another reason going off the cliff in the long term is not going to be that beneficial. there is nothing in the peelts for going off the cliff that address our long term entitlement problems. you still have that problem. >> gregg: i apologize you. we have breaking news we have to get to. jamie weinstein, thanks. >> heather: news conference going on in irving, texas where the police department is talking about a car accident that has left one dallas cowboys teammate dead and another behind bars. let's listen. >> okay. the irving police department is investigating a single fatality accident involving two dallas cowboy football players. at approximately 2:21 this morning, joshua brent was traveling wes
credit this body with being a driving force in that because we were elected by the american people who want to see their fiscal bucks put back in order, but we succeeded on the discretionary side. discretionary turns out to be the easier nut to crack because that money doesn't go out the door unless this u.s. house of representatives acts. that distinguishes it, mr. speaker, from mandatory spending. that's the third set of columns on my chart. mandatory spending, as i said, 2/3 of our budget, 68.3% to be precise, and of all the sequestration cuts, 63.8% of the budget is only going to bear 14.4% of the pain. the back story there, mr. speaker, is that's the only 14.4% of the pain. as i said discretionary spending has been on the chopping block in 2011, 2012, and now again in 2013. but mandatory spending we haven't had a single agreement about, and i don't hear the white house talking about it, either. the white house put together a group it was called the simpson-bowles commission. it was named afterers kin bowles, a former clinton chief of staff, and alan simpson, former republican sena
assad's regime by creating a joint leadership. the new group consists of a 30-member elected council and in a move that could mean support from the west, two of the most extreme fighting groups in syria were not invited to the meeting in turkey. . >>> and now to fox 5 follow-up. pressure is mounting in london for two australian radio hosts to be removed from the air, this after a nurse who was tricked by the hosts' prank call committed suicide. jacintha saldanha was found near the hospital on friday. friends and family believe it was from stress of the call. the station's chief executive says while they are devastated about the news, they did nothing, quote, illegal. >> this is a tragic event. these people are human beings. we are all affected by this. there is no straightforward answer to your question. we will make sure that their well-being is the priority for us. >> the duke and duchess of cambridge say they are, quote, deeply saddened about the nurse's death. a palace spokesman said there were never any complaints to the hospital about the call. >>> the man accused of pushing an
spending cuts go into effect, a lot of folks are going to say where was the president? he was just re-elected. why couldn't he put together a package, a deal to avoid this disaster? >> i think this is a question of political leadership. and as that poll showed, there's no doubt that the president has the political advantage going into this. but at some point, and i think we're kind of getting close to it, the president has to be able to pivot and to say how do i turn this political advantage into a real policy accomplishment? and, wolf, i don't think you're going to do that with continued campaign style events like we just saw meeting with middle class families. okay. we get that. that occurred during the campaign. the white house has clearly gotten its message out. i think now there has to be a next step. you know, timing is everything in politics. and this is absolutely no different. what i'm getting from talking to some democrats on the hill is i think there's actually a lot of pent up anger and frustration among democrats how they feel republicans were obstructionist for the last four yea
. >> it was the election. take a look at the other top searchers. is iphone 5. got one. love it. kim kardashian. one of our makeup artist thinks parts of cardian are not real. cape upton and kate middleton. she dacame in at number 5. >> gingham style is another one. >> do do you the gingham style with patty ann? >> another day. >>> coming up the death of an nfl player is reigniting the gun debate all across the country. >> it's about the social commentary about the proliferation of guns. >> do you want to take away people's second amendment rights? >> it only gets more heated. that debate up next. >> do you have allergies? many might come from the type of water you drink. bottled verses tap. stay tuned. e balancing the company's bottom line, their very first word was... [ to the tune of "lullaby and good night" ] ♪ af-lac ♪ aflac [ male announcer ] find out more at... [ duck ] aflac! [ male announcer ] [ yawning sound ] progresso. in what world do potatoes, bacon and cheese add up to 100 calories? your world. ♪ [ whispers ] real bacon... creamy cheese... 100 calories... [ chef ] m
think this election just proved it. i think the only reason the war -- the right wing has gained a their benefits in 2012 is because they were angry about the economic issues at enter our country. host: may 8 of this year, taking a look at gay marriage. according to their headlines, half of the americans at the time supported gay marriage. 50% saying it should be valid. do you think they should or should not be recognized by the law as valid. 50% said it should be, 48% said they should not be valid. it goes back in the -- it goes back to track these opinions since 1996. you can see how attitudes have changed, at least according to gallup as far as where the current date figures stand it. various groups weighing in the on in this topic. one perspective from the family research council. from twitter -- two cases on gay marriage to be decided by the supreme court. one dealing with the state level issue, when dealing with the defense of marriage act when it comes to federal policy. your chance to weigh in on this in the next half hour. parole from jacksonville, florida. -- earl from
by the fiscal future. he could be concerned about every citizen in the state that he was elected to serve. his job -- those are his constituents and that's his job. >> look, i see where you come from. we have to think about this in a broader sense. if every state is looking out for itself, there's going to free ride. they're going to engage in policies that damage everyone's well-being over the long term by looking out for their own re-election prospects. these guys are being political rather than looking out for the long-term interests of their citizens, their states and also the country as a whole. rather than sub sid dies development in really dangerous areas. that's called moral hazard, and that's something that's really bringing the country to its knees economically. >> last i checked, you look out for yourself. you might say that's not a great idea, if you're in new york -- actually, no, if you're in new york you're concerned about new york and not about california. you focus on where you are. that's a reality. >> all right. thanks very much to both of us. please let us know what you thi
their positions, and to basically refuse to take yes for an answer. the republicans immediately after the election said, we are going to give on this revenue thing, we're going to have to raise revenues, the question is how are we going to do it? and the obama administration almost like a character from "seinfeld" said we are going to do this out of spite and said we are going to have to raise the rates rather than do this loophole closing thing and all of the rest. the problem with that is that presidents get very few do officer, one ever the few that they get is right after an election they can change the tone, they can sort of start over and instead of doing that and trying to figure out how to fulfill this promise that obama has always made about being bipartisan he's decided just to sort of do the same thing he did with the stimulus, which is to try to steam roll the republicans, to crush them, to placate his base, and it has the potential to create another four years of partisan whommer and tong fighting in washington. jon: i wanted to get your reaction to what the treasury secretary had to
do well. having said that, welcome again, mr. secretary. just days after the president's re-election, the f.h.a. released its 2012 actuarial report which revealed that the economic value of the f.h.a. fund has fallen to negative $16 billion. a lot of money. that means the fund's capital reserve ratio, as i understand it, now stands at a negative 1.44%. this news is obviously very disturbing to us and to the secretary. for those of us who have long been concerned about the health of the f.h.a. for years the problems of the federal housing administration have been well-known. during the housing boom, the f.h.a. unweissly, i thought, guaranteed -- unwisely, i thought, guaranteed millions of risky mortgages with low down payments to borrowers with poor credit scores. we are reaping that now. these mortgages have resulted in billions of losses to the f.h.a. the federal housing administration has made matters worse, i think, by failing to come to grips with the magnitude, mr. secretary, of the problems. back in 2007, as the federal housing administration's poor financial position was becom
an election. the conservatives are likely to take power. and support nuclear power once again. that's likely to cause gridlock in the parliament, send demonstrators in the streets. back to you, charlie and norah. >> lucy craft, thank you. >>> back here in washington there is little movement toward a compromise to avoid the fiscal cliff. there are just 25 days until the deadline. officials are saying the negotiations are now in the had hands of two men, president obama and house speaker eer jo boehner. bill plante is at the white house. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. and good morning in the west. the president has stepped up his rhetoric, warning failure to fix the fiscal crisis could sour the christmas season. as another day passed without any real progress, president obama ventured out to push his claim that the middle class will suffer. ♪ you better watch out you better not cry ♪ >> at the national christmas tree lighting, president obama joined the holiday mood. but earlier, visiting a middle class virginia family, he threatened that congress could ruin the christmas season
presidential candidates the lake jack kemp. >> though i wish this election turned out a little differently, i'm proud of the campaign that mitt romney and i ran. losing is part of politics. and it can often prepare the way for greater victories. >> speaking of greater victories, at the latest "washington post"/abc poll on hillary clinton, chris cizilla indicates strong support for hillary clinton. she has really i guess she's the most popular figure in american politics. >> she is at her highest popularity rating that we have ever in "the washington post"/abc poll measured her and almost six in ten, 57% of americans, this isn't democrats, this is the american public broadly, want her to run for president in 2016. now, i would say, if she becomes a candidate, i think -- inevitably she'll be seen much more in that partisan atmosphere, some of her stratospheric numbers will drop down. i would say she has been skeptical very skeptical of running. if you look at these numbers if you have any interest of being the president of the united states this may be a hard race to say no to. >> i think the r
was elected to serve. his job, those are his constituents. that's his job. >> well, look. i see where you're coming from but we have to think about this in a broader sense. okay? if every state is looking out only for itself, what they're going to do is free ride. they're going to engage in policies that damage everyone's wellbeing over the long term looking out for their own re-election prospects. >> wait, wait. >> they're really political rather than looking out for the long-term interests of the citizens, their states and also the country as a whole. >> last i checked -- >> beforehand rather than subsidize development and dangerous areas and that's moral hazard and that's something that's bringing the country to the knees economically. >> last i checked you look out for yourself. >> that's public servants are supposed to do, roland. >> no. in new york, you are concerned about new york and not california. you focus on where you are. that's the reality. >> all right. we are going to hit pause there. please let us know what you think about that conversation on twitter and facebook page. >
a dozen tea party-like conservatives elected. >> let me jump in, dana. i want to run through them because, you know, when we think senator demint we think of a tea party stronghold within the u.s. senate and helped and also hurt a number of republican candidates. who were they? >> reporter: that's right. great. let's start with the senators now. obviously, who he helped elect. this is the positive side of his millions and his work. marco rubio, pat toomey. very conservative, anti-tax, anti-government purists in the mold of jim demint. however, he also backed in republican primaries a number of republican candidates who simply were not electable according to the republican establishment and the establishment was right. for example, remember christine o'donnell, i'm not a witch, from delaware. ken buck of colorado. and others. so those are some of the reasons why he definitely has ruffled many a-feather with the party leaders and i have to tell you first thing i saw when the senate republican leader mitch mcconnell released a statement today was making the point that demint had, quote, unco
would note that the president was in cam cambodia after the election, and then he was in burma, and secretary clinton moves throughout the region as well as secretary panetta, and the amount of activities i do and my forces do is a prompt jump than what we did in the past, and we're looking for opportunities to do more exercise. we are doing more of those things already, and that's viz l to the allies. i think it's visible to the partners, and i feel it visible to the region. we oftenment to jump to, well, where's the next aircraft carry your or the submarine. that's the signal. we will, over time, as you've heard secretary panetta say, rebalance towards the pacific, and i mentioned opening remarks. we're rapidly moving the most capable assets into the region because of the ballistic missile defense threats we face and those things, so it's about a holistic approach, and what i do on the military side is just one aspect of it. it's got to be tie into the economic side, what's happening in the diplomatic side, and so we're working hard that accomplishes this strategy. >> a quick
we asked -- these are exit polls from november 6, from the last election, of course. should same-sex marriage be legally recognized, yes, 49%, no, 46%. obviously, the country is closely divided on this. but we have seen a little bit of a shift in the numbers. brian, do you think that the time has come that attitudes about this have changed and the court will go with that change? >> no, i don't think that's the case at all. i mean, look, six months ago, north carolina voted by over 61% to protect marriage as the union of a man and a woman. of course, there were the four deep blue liberal statings that voted to redefine marriage, but that's an indication of the future of the you country. there is no constitutional right to redefine marriage. our founding fathers didn't see it that way, the last supreme court decision, the united states supreme court said there was no federal question here. so this is essentially making the law up as you go along, it is reading into the constitution. i do not believe the united states supreme court is going to launch another culture war, just like r
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